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Progressive Overload and Repetition!

WHAT ARE THE MAIN COMPONENTS OF SEEING RESULTS AT BÜNDA?
1. PROGRESSIVE OVERLOAD.

What is Progressive Overload? 

​Overload is putting greater stress on the body than it is accustomed to and doing this frequently will begin to initiate a change in the body. The most understood method of overload is simply adding weight to an exercise. You do a movement/exercise, you repeat it focusing on form, then when you are ready, you add additional resistance.

Other methods of progressive overload are:

• Changing the order of the exercise (Example: starting with a bridge in round 1 and ending with the bridge in round 3)
• Exercise tempo (Example: a negative push up)
• Playing with training volume (Example: number of reps x sets)
• Adding a variation (Example: single leg bridge versus a regular bridge)

Progressive Overload is the main component of Bünda’s floor program and highlights the importance of being on a training program. We promise you results if you are adding the appropriate stress on the body.

2. REPETITION OF THE SAME EXERCISES.

Did you know the first 4 weeks of a new training program are all neuromuscular adaptations?

During the first 4 weeks, your mind and muscles are trying to sync together to do the movements properly and efficiently. Therefore, REPETITION OF THE SAME EXERCISES IS KEY and allows you to master the basics and form invoking muscle memory. If you never repeat the same workout twice, you will never leave the neuromuscular stage resulting in minimal physical change. Physical results take time and involves choosing a few movements and performing them well – NOT worrying about always “changing it up”. Our body will adapt to the specific demands that we place upon it, and there is very little cross over in strength from one movement to the next. So, we must train our bodies from all planes of motion using various loads and joint positioning, which gives us the greatest benefit and cross over to everyday tasks and sports performance.